Is It Wrong to Give Your Kid an Extraordinary Name?

Kreig303:

As my first name is “Kreig” I have always had mixed feelings on this subject.

Originally posted on Painting On Scars:

Hello My Name Is... (Image by Alan O’Rourke of workcompass.com used under CC licensevia)

Every coupled friend I have here in Germany is, as of this year, a parent. And looking upon the names bestowed upon the new generation, I must say I like them all. Or at least, I don’t hate any of them. This is impressive when considering that, if my partner and I ever want to get into a fight, we simply start discussing names we would hypothetically pick for a child. Just give us five minutes and soon we’ll be shouting, “Bo-ring!” “Flaky!” “Hideous!”

And then we run up against the unanswerable question: Is it harder to have a mundane (a.k.a. boring) name or an unusual (a.k.a. weird) name?

While I enjoy the sound of my own name—as many if not most people do—I haven’t enjoyed seeing Emily end up in the top ten of the most popular…

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Is It Wrong to Give Your Kid an Extraordinary Name?

60 years ago today the Third Avenue El closed in Manhattan

Originally posted on Fans in a Flashbulb:

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Arnold Eagle (1909-1992), Third Avenue El; Chatham Square Station, New York, ca. 1940, (461.1987)

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Arnold Eagle, Third Avenue El; 34th Street Station, New York, 1943, (479.1987)

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Arnold Eagle, Third Avenue El; Looking Up from 27th Street, New York, ca. 1938, (470.1987)

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Lee Sievan (1907-1990), Chatham Square, Where Third and Second Avenues Meet, New York, 1946, (1.1990)

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Berenice Abbott (1898-1991), “El,” Second and Third Avenue Lines, New York, April 24, 1936, (251.1985)

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Arnold Eagle (1909-1992), Under the Third Avenue El, North of 27th St., New York, 1939, (480.1987)

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Weegee (1899-1968), Under the Third Avenue El; But there is beauty along the street of forgotten men… it lies in the patterned black and white gold along the trolley tracks where the morning sun breaks through, Bowery, New York, ca. 1945, (

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60 years ago today the Third Avenue El closed in Manhattan

Sympathy For The Comcast

Firstly, a little background reading:

New Comcast Customer Service Upgrades Will Not Solve Problems

Now with that out of the way, I’d like to express “Sympathy For The Comcast” (with apologies to the Rolling Stones).

I’ve been a Comcast customer one way or another for nearly 15 years, in both California and Connecticut. I’ve had my quibbles with their service at one time or another — sometimes they had buggy STB software; sometimes, their internet service wasn’t up to snuff; but by and large I’ve been more-or-less satisfied with the quality of the service, as the only truly viable choice anywhere I’ve lived.

Having said that, I find it strange that people despise their customer service so much. In general I’ve found their technical support for both cable and internet to be acceptable, if not always stellar (an opinion I also have of Verizon Wireless which also gets regularly slated). But why does my opinion differ so substantially from “the man in the street”?

I can tell you why — I’ve worked in IT my whole life, and I’ve also worked in the broadcast industry. Furthermore, I don’t call them to scream at them.

I know that this gives me a “leg up” on the average consumer as I can describe and diagnose my issues with some degree of competence which the average consumer would not be able to do. Furthermore, having started my working life lo-so-many-years-ago in retail when I was a teenager I’ve always had a very cordial aspect to working with phone support.

In truth I think Comcast has the same issue most technology-based corporations have i.e. the audience they are selling to is by-and-large very unable to speak the same lingo and moreover this audience lacks the background to “self-diagnose” issues and work with the phone support to come to a useful resolution.

In other words I see the problem as simply being intractable in some ways. Comcast is an easy target for the ire of persons because they don’t see the issues that are going to crop up with such a large and diverse network and such a huge userbase. Joe Consumer is simply gonna know “it doesn’t work” and “why I am paying money for something which doesn’t work”.

Anyways, I just wanted to play “devil’s advocate” on this particular issue because I know from my own empirical standpoint that the customer service issues really have less to do with competence or commitment on Comcast’s part and more to do with the crevasse of expectation between “insiders” (Comcast and tech-savvy customer) and “outsiders” (non-tech-savvy customers).

Let the flaming commence.☺

Sympathy For The Comcast

The one word reporters should add to Twitter searches that you probably haven’t considered — Medium

A truly educational column from a NY Times reporter on Medium (AKA the other WordPress or Tumblr).

The punchline is certainly a keyword that would have never have occurred to…

me. 😀

The one word reporters should add to Twitter searches that you probably haven’t considered — Medium.

The one word reporters should add to Twitter searches that you probably haven’t considered — Medium

In Honor of AFC Bournemouth’s Promotion…

In honor of AFC Bournemouth’s seemingly miraculous achievement — one which is always interesting to us long-time fans — BBC Sport has put together a nice retrospective on the other clubs who have made it into the top flight in the last two decades sans pedigree.

BBC Sport – Bournemouth: The minnows who made the Premier League.

Of course they’ll probably get lumps kicked out of them and stay rooted to the foot of the table all season.  Still, it’s nice to see a new face in the top flight.

In Honor of AFC Bournemouth’s Promotion…